Stone Bullwebber

Also known as: bullwebber
Primarily found in: Sirasea, among the rocky parts of the desert between cities

Visual Description

A stone bullwebber is slightly bigger than a rhinoceros. Its main body looks like a large boulder, with reptilian legs and feet underneath. In the front, only a gaping mouth yawns, with rings of inwardly-pointing dull yellow fangs inside. Three extremely long, whip-like tendrils extend from beneath its mouth. Between its legs lies its soft underside, where a single eyeball the size of a large helmet rests (an obvious weak spot). The eye can extend slightly from its fleshy nest, extruding on a slimy pink stalk.

Behavior

A bullwebber uses its natural camouflage to hide among other rocks. It chooses a site, then shuffles around until its legs and eye are underground, making sure its mouth is closed to complete the illusion of a harmless boulder sitting in the sand. It then uses its tendrils to dig out a burrow underneath itself, for later use. By mixing sand with its saliva, it can produce a web-like material that it uses to blanket the area around the burrow entrance. It then lies in wait for prey to get caught in the web, which alerts the bullwebber to its presence. The web is very fine and difficult to see.

Bullwebbers commonly maintain several burrows across the landscape, in which they hide captured prey (bound by webbing) to eat later. They travel between them by night, leaving them plugged by real boulders that they place there with their powerful tendrils. If caught on its feet, a bullwebber will usually immediately attempt to eat any potential prey smaller than itself, using the tendrils to whip and grab them. It makes sure to keep its eye out of sight, only flashing it sometimes to analyze situations. If it fails several attempts to eat its target, it will try to incapacitate it with tendril whips, stomps, and sticky projectile spits. A bullwebber will try to hide from anything larger than itself, and will even wait hours to make sure it is safe to come out.

Bullwebbers sometimes wander where there are trails during the night, but this is a rare occurence.

Stone Bullwebber

Sirasea steeltrain23